Joy of Africa, Tanzania, 2017

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” A story has no beginning or end: arbitrarily one chooses that moment of experience from which to look back or from which to look ahead…” ( Graham Green)

imageSince my childhood, I have always been magnetized by the train. The sound of a train whistle, the announcement of the approaching station, the sound of wheels on steel.

The train station is its self an intrigued little universe where stories and people are overlapped and intertwined. No matter what the final destination is, the train stills in me a sense of freedom, charm. A sense of nostalgia and home.

It is here where I like reading a book, observe the dimension of the world through the window , write on my diary, let my face and arms enjoy the sun and the wind, fall asleep.

But overall, it is here that I like observing the time passing by so slowly. I build my temporary micro universe and I decide to either be a viewer of the society or actively mix with the life around me and my companions.

I took this picture few days ago, at the Kigoma train station where few times a week the train still connects people, and not only, between the west and the east of Tanzania.

For months I have been thinking to make that journey and take that express train myself.

 

Stone Town, Zanzibar 2016

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Stone Town, Zanzibar 2016

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” Women & Water” – Burundi, 2003

giorgio-faedo-39” You don’t have to be a woman to understand water sustains life. But these Burundian women know that clean water is a valued commodity in the world around them. A world in which the sick often die and the health service isn’t so much a service, than an ideal of a ‘service’ not yet realised. From the cradle to the coffin, the story of water has shaped the success or failure of many of our societies, our communities and our civilisations. It’s a precious resources these women are prepared to wait for.”

– Nicholas McGowan, Australia –

” True resilience can be seen in the wonder of a child’s eyes.” – Chad, 2006

giorgio-faedo-40“Year after year, communities across the Sahel are challenged by erratic rainfall, climate change and high food prices.  Durable solutions to such challenges rely on the hope and creativity of the communities that are most affected by them.”

– Curtis Stefaniuk, Canada –

Burma, 2008

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“a warm-hearted smile” Burma, 2008

giorgio-faedo-36“In 2008 I traveled to Myanmar to help the victims of the Cyclone Nargis. On that May 2008, the cyclone blew away homes, it killed livestock, sank fishing fleets and damaged acres of rice paddies with seawater. I traveled by boat for many days down the Delta. All around us a devastated landscape, the victims were left with nothing but their simple hospitality and their warm-hearted smile. This picture reminds me of the strength of relationships among  human beings, the anchor that saves us in all situations.”


Nel 2008 viaggiai in Birmania per aiutare le vittime dell’Uragano Nargis. Nel Maggio di quell’anno, l’Uragano spazzò via case, uccise animali, portò via reti da pesca e l’acqua salina distrusse campi di riso. Viaggiai per giorni lungo il Delta con piccole piroghe. Attorno a noi un paesaggio devastato. I sopravvissuti avevano perso tutto ma non la loro ospitalità e il loro dolce sorriso. Questa foto mi ricorda la forza di una relazione umana, ancora di salvezza in tutte le situazioni.”

– Giorgio Faedo, Italy –

” the water boy” – Burundi, 2004

giorgio-faedo-37“Just as water is the essence of life, this moment captures both the innocence and naivety of youth and life with a classic photograph of a boy and a  water-bowl. It is the bowl in which life-sustaining water will be transported and stored. In Burundi, locals have confronted and overcome the terror of war and adversity of famine to etch out for themselves a nation of stoic and creative people who are building for new generations opportunity, peace and prosperity, not seen for decades.”

– Nicholas McGowan, Australia –

Burma, 2008

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